The Sunny Side
By Lisa Turner
A rich source of protein, vitamins, and minerals, eggs make great-tasting dishes (try our mouthwatering vegetarian recipes!)

It’s a few days after Easter, and your refrigerator is burdened with chocolate bunnies and baskets of eggs, reminders of festivities past. What to do with them? We can’t help you with the bunnies, but we’ve got lots of simple and delicious ways to use up those eggs, as well as a half-dozen healthful reasons to eat them all up—before next Easter. Start with these:



Avocado and Chipotle Deviled Eggs Serves 6

6 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and halved lengthwise

1 very ripe medium avocado, peeled and cubed

1/4 cup minced green onions

1 small canned chipotle chile, seeded and minced

2 Tbs. minced cilantro, plus chives for garnish

  1. Carefully remove yolks from eggs, and place in medium bowl; set whites aside.
  2. Add avocado to yolks, and mash with fork until smooth. Stir in green onions, chipotle, and cilantro. Season with salt and white pepper, if desired.
  3. Fill egg halves with yolk mixture, and arrange on serving platter. Garnish with thinly sliced chives, and serve.

PER SERVING: 117 CAL; 7 G PROT; 9 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 3 G CARB; 212 MG CHOL; 262 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 1 G SUGARS
 


Eggstraordinary! A Half-Dozen Reasons to Eat Eggs

  1. Eggs are cheap. Money’s tight, and meat is costly. A 4-ounce serving of salmon will set you back about $4; the same amount of steak runs anywhere from $2 to $5. The cost of two eggs? 50 cents.
  2. They’re rich in iron. Two eggs supply about 14 percent of a woman’s daily iron requirements, about 22 percent for men—important news, since many Americans are deficient in this essential nutrient.
  3. An egg breakfast boosts weight loss. In one study, people who ate two eggs for their morning meal lost almost twice as much weight as those who ate the same number of calories, but started their day with a bagel. And a large egg has only 75 calories, about the same as an apple.
  4. They have high-quality protein power. Two eggs supply 13 grams of protein, twice the amount in ½ cup of beans and about the same as 2 ounces of meat. And eggs have a biological value of 100, a measure of the proportion of absorbed protein from a food.
  5. Eggs lower inflammation. They’re the richest source of choline, a hard-to-get nutrient that reduces inflammation. In a recent study, people who had the most choline in their diets showed 20 percent lower inflammation.
  6. They’re serious brain food. The choline in eggs is also a key component of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the brain that’s responsible for sleep, memory, attention, intelligence, and mood. It’s especially important for pregnant women, since choline plays a crucial role in fetal brain development.

Egg Salad with Rosemary Ravigote on Ciabatta Rolls Serves 4

5 hard-boiled eggs, peeled, divided

1/2 cup minced red onion, divided

1/4 cup white wine or champagne vinegar

2 tsp. drained caper

2 tsp. Dijon mustaard

2 tsp. minced rosemary leaves

1 clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.)

1/2 cup olive oil

4 ciabatta rolls, halved

2 cups arugula

1 small vine-ripened tomato, cut into 1/4-inch slices

  1. Coarsely chop 4 eggs, and place in medium bowl; stir in ¼ cup red onions, and set aside.
  2. Force remaining egg through sieve into separate bowl. Stir in vinegar, remaining ¼ cup red onion, capers, mustard, rosemary, and garlic. Whisk in oil until sauce is blended. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.
  3. Pour ravigote sauce over chopped eggs, reserving ¼ cup sauce. Fold eggs and sauce together gently.
  4. Arrange rolls cut-side up on work surface. Spread egg mixture over bottoms of rolls. Divide arugula between bread bottoms. Spread remaining ravigote sauce over roll tops, and divide tomatoes between each. Serve open-faced.

PER SERVING: 620 CAL; 17 G PROT; 36 G TOTAL FAT (6 G SAT FAT); 70 G CARB; 265 MG CHOL; 926 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS




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