Trends to Watch, June 2018

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Royal Advice

Want to live like a king—or, at least, a princess? Try taking a probiotic. That’s the advice from Meghan Markle, who was scheduled to marry Prince Harry of England in May.

Essential Formulas Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics

Want to live like a king—or, at least, a princess? Try taking a probiotic. That’s the advice from Meghan Markle, who was scheduled to marry Prince Harry of England in May. “Always travel with a high strain probiotic and hydrate like you’re dying of thirst,” Markle wrote on her blog. “This dynamic duo of probiotics and agua will keep your gut health in check and honestly stave off jet lag.” Markle’s probiotic of choice? Essential Formulas Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics.

Prenatal Health … for Men

Women have long been aware that prenatal diet and lifestyle can have profound implications for the health of their children, but researchers from the University of Southampton in England recently published a review of research in The Lancet that emphasizes the importance of these factors in men, as well.

Women have long been aware that prenatal diet and lifestyle can have profound implications for the health of their children, but researchers from the University of Southampton in England recently published a review of research in The Lancet that emphasizes the importance of these factors in men, as well.

The researchers examined studies from around the world, and determined, among other findings, that male obesity is associated with poor sperm quality, and may be associated with increased risk of chronic health issues in offspring later in life. “Research is now showing that our gametes and early embryos are sensitive to a variety of environmental conditions including poor parental diet. These effects can change the process of development, affecting growth, metabolism, and health of offspring, making the case for both parents to have a healthy lifestyle well before conception and pregnancy,” said Tom Flemming, PhD, coauthor of the review.

$220 billion

According to Zion Market Research, global sales for dietary supplements are expected to reach $220 billion annually by 2022.

CBD Oil is gaining recognition

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, an extract of the cannabis plant that doesn’t contain the euphoria-inducing compound THC, has become a popular dietary supplement for relieving pain, anxiety, insomnia, and more.

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, an extract of the cannabis plant that doesn’t contain the euphoria-inducing compound THC, has become a popular dietary supplement for relieving pain, anxiety, insomnia, and more. And reports of its effectiveness are spurring interest in mainstream medicine.

Researchers from the New York University School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health recently announced a new study that will examine CBD oil as a possible treatment for Alcohol Abuse Disorder in people who suffer from PTSD. “This study will be the first to test whether CBD is effective in treating alcohol addiction and in treating PTSD in humans, and the first to examine the interaction between these treatment effects. Results will serve as proof of concept and provide guidance for a future larger clinical trial,” write the researchers in their description of the study, which is set to begin in November.

More Problems with Processed Meat

High consumption of processed meats may lead to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance (IR).

High consumption of processed meats may lead to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance (IR). Scientists from the University of Haifetz in Israel screened a group of adults aged 40–70 to determine their eating habits. Those who reported the highest consumption of red or processed meats had higher odds of NAFLD and IR than those who consumed little meat, even when adjusted for other risk factors such as body weight. Additionally, a high intake of meats cooked using unhealthy methods such as frying was independently associated with increased risk of IR.

“High red and processed meat consumption is related to several diseases. In addition, cooking meat at high temperatures for a long duration forms heterocyclic amines, which have harmful health effects,” the researchers wrote in the March issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

30%

In the first 5 years after menopause, the skin loses up to 30% of its natural collagen. See “Crazy for Collagen” for more information on this skin-protective supplement.

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